April 9, 2011

Northwestern tops at National Trial Competiton

Northwestern University Law School won what turned out to be an all-Chicago final round at the national finals of the Texas Young Lawyers Association National Trial Competition earlier today. Illinois Institute of Technology Chicago-Kent College of Law was the runner-up. Charlotte School of Law and Northern Kentucky University Salmon P. Chase College of Law were the other Final Four teams. More than 300 teams originally entered from the 14 different regional competitions.

Ryan Nolte of Chicago-Kent was the National Best Oralist.

Duke tops McGeorge for NAAC crown

Duke University School of Law has won the 2010-11 ABA National Appellate Advocacy Competition, effectively besting 207 teams spread across six regional competitions. University of the Pacific McGeorge School of Law was second. Texas Tech University School of Law and University of Texas School of Law were the national semifinalists.

McGeorge and Texas tied for the National Best Brief award. Wilbert Vancol of the University of Florida Fredric G. Levin College of Law was the National Best Advocate.

My friend Joe Lester of Faulkner University Thomas Goode Jones School of Law commented after my quarterfinal results post that it was a definite change to see the top four seeds make it to the semifinals. I'd agree; remember, before the break rounds started, I myself said that the seedings probably didn't matter given recent history. But a key change in this year's rules -- that of letting the higher seed choose its side (as opposed to deciding sides by coinflip, as many competitions do) -- was probably the difference maker. This year's problem was, at least in my opinion, heavily weighted in the Petitioner's favor. Nearly all of the schools picking their sides, both in Chicago and at the Seattle regional, chose Petitioner. And while it wasn't always true that Petitioner won (indeed, one of my own teams was knocked out arguing that side), the Petitioner team won in the finals.

So, perhaps that explains it. Perhaps it doesn't. Regardless, I think the new rule is great (you may remember that I started pushing for it two years ago) because it actually rewards those teams with higher seeds. Before, there was no real benefit to being ranked higher.

Anyway, congrats to Duke on a huge win, and to McGeorge for a very impressive finish.

April 8, 2011

ABA NAAC semifinal results

Duke (#4 seed) def. Texas (#1 seed)
McGeorge (#3) def. Texas Tech (#2)

National championship game tomorrow morning. I'll blog the results after I get back from the awards luncheon around 2 p.m.

ABA NAAC quarterfinal results

Texas (#1 seed) def. Wash U (#9 seed)
Duke (#4) def. Texas Tech (#12)
McGeorge (#3) def. Wash U (#6)
Texas Tech (#2) def. Cal (#10)

ABA NAAC octafinal results

South Texas's bid for the hat trick is dead. Half of the remaining eight teams belong to Wash U and Texas Tech.

Texas (#1 seed) def. Chapman (#16 seed)
Wash U (#9) def. McGeorge (#8)
Texas Tech (#12) def. Memphis (#5)
Duke (#4) def. Florida (#13)
McGeorge (#3) def. Indiana Indy (#14)
Cal (#10) def. South Texas (#7)
Texas Tech (#2) def. Duke (#15)

Live blogging from the NAAC finals

The national finals of the ABA National Appellate Advocacy Competition are underway, with the preliminary rounds starting and finishing yesterday. The original field of 24 now stands at 16.

Several teams had to be artificially re-seeded because the rules dictate that two teams from the same school cannot meet each other until the national championship match. I've noted those teams below. The last few years the seeding has meant very little; South Texas College of Law has won both times as the #15 seed (2009) and the #16 seed (2010). Can they pull of a three-peat???

The top 16 teams, in order of their seeds:

1. University of Texas School of Law
2. Texas Tech University School of Law
3. University of the Pacific McGeorge School of Law (originally #4)
4. Duke University School of Law (originally #3)
5. University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law
6. Washington University in St. Louis School of Law
7. South Texas College of Law (originally #9)
8. University of the Pacific McGeorge School of Law
9. Washington University in St. Louis School of Law (originally #7)
10. UC Berkeley Boalt Hall School of Law
11. Seton Hall University School of Law (originally #12)
12. Texas Tech University School of Law (originally #11)
13. University of Florida Fredric G. Levin College of Law
14. Indiana University School of Law - Indianapolis
15. Duke University School of Law
16. Chapman University School of Law